You Don’t Need to Buy Influence in China

China’s opinion leaders are getting very smart about monetizing their influence, meaning that for many companies, the cost of engaging with trusted voices is rising beyond their budgets. In this article for the CampaignIQ Quarterly’s Cannes special issue “China, Dealing with the Rising Cost of Influence,” I explain why companies don’t have to resort to …

Intel, China, and the Future of Smart Cars

If Intel is hoping that it has locked up the race to create an industry-standard computing and sensing platform for smart cars, little doubt that they are hoping that China will not take notice until it is too late. I penned this piece for The Stream (“Intelligent Automobiles: Why Beijing Will Not Let Intel Drive …

Why did Uber China slap its foreign users in the face?

David Wolf, a China technology expert based in Beijing, answers some quick questions about Uber’s mystifying and frustrating about-face restricting foreign users of its Chinese app. Source: Why did Uber China slap its foreign users in the face? – SupChina Jeremy Goldkorn gives great interview, and this article proves that, when you ask the right …

PR News: The Influence, Allison+Partners, & More | EPR

Three New Partners at Allison+Partners: Three notables at Allison+Partners have upgraded their titles to “partner.” Lisa Rosenberg, David Wolf, and Jerry Zhu moved up the ladder recently. Rosenberg has been serving as chief creative officer since 2013. Before that she worked at RSCG Worldwide (now Havas) as president, and Porter Novelli for 20 years starting …

Jeff Weiner: LinkedIn’s Expansion Into China Is Key

Jeff Weiner: LinkedIn’s Expansion Into China Is Key – Bloomberg Business. LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner speaks with Bloomberg in 2014 abut how important China is to the company and why. It was an honor to work with Jeff and his CMO Shannon Stubo and their team as they thought through how they could bring LinkedIn to …

Public Relations and the Chinese Government

Chris Daniels of PR Week delves into the question of why China suddenly feels like it needs a PR firm. He called me up in Shanghai and asked for my thoughts, and he was kind enough to feature me in the article. The key quote: “Our industry remains dogged by such accounts as Thank You …

Influencing Government Policy in China: The Basics

I write about influencing government policy with a healthy degree of trepidation. The idea of circumventing the will of the people to induce a government to do the bidding of a private corporation never sits well with those of us with a Jeffersonian pedigree. But in nearly three decades doing business in and with China, there …

International NGOs in China: Through a Law, Darkly

At the invitation of the folks from LinkedIn, I am experimenting with blogging on their platform. One of the first posts I’ve placed on the site is one that examines the meaning of the upcoming legislation on international NGOs in China. My prognosis for the law itself is not cheery – no surprise to anyone …

Why It’s Time to Stop Slipping Cash to Journalists in China

This morning Advertising Age published my editorial calling for an end to the common practice of paying journalists in China for coverage. You can read the editorial here. Early reactions are mostly supportive, but there are a number of people who believe that the problem will never be solved. I respectfully disagree. Historically the media in every …

Quote of the Week

“There is only one sure means in life,” Deasey said, “of ensuring that you are not ground into paste by disappointment, futility, and disillusion. And that is always to ensure, to the utmost of your ability, that you are doing it solely for the money.” Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay A …